All Border Landscapes near Oswestry

Nesscliffe Hill
Border Landscapes – Nesscliffe Hill

“A little bit of heaven on earth” was how Lloyd George described the Ceiriog Valley and we think that can be applied to all the Border landscapes here – where Shropshire meets Wales.

Both the Ceiriog and the Tanat valleys lead deeper into Wales and take you to such delights as Llanrhaeadr waterfall and the Berwyn Mountains, not to mention charming villages with more than one country pub waiting to welcome you.

Enjoy the tranquillity of waterside havens such as Ellesmere, Lake Vyrnwy and the towpaths of the Montgomery and Llangollen canals for a more peaceful view of the Borderlands and as you wander around look out for award winning and unusual gardens. For a more natural landscape, why not search out the wildlife meadows? See bluebells each spring or, if you are lucky, you may even spot a bee orchid.

There have been a few rogues living in these Borderlands over the years and you can visit the haunt of on Humphrey Kynaston at Nesscliffe, this country park will show Shropshire spread beneath you as you wonder about our highwayman’s antics in years gone by.

To see Shropshire from another bird’s eye view then a visit to Hawkstone Follies will show you the wonderful patchwork fields that make up so much of this little known county.

Welsh Borders
Border Landscapes – view to the Berwyns
  • Llynclys Common

    A large mixed reserve with limestone grassland along the spine of the hill, flanked by scrub and established woodland. Location: 5km south of Oswestry, park in parking area down lane opposite the Lime Kiln pub and walk up nearby bridleway. Grid ref SJ 273 237. For more information contact the Read more [...]

  • Artisans Lake Vyrnwy

    It doesn’t matter whether you’re in the mood for a walk, a bike ride, bird watching, or simply a day of leisure – Lake Vyrnwy has something for everyone. Once here, Artisans Coffee Shop is well worth a visit. Whether you’re looking for a morning coffee and cake, a light Read more [...]

  • Llanymynech rocks

    Species rich grassland, dominated by spectacular disused limestone quarries. Mixed woodland and wonderful views. Offa’s Dyke path runs through the reserve. Great archaeological interest for limestone quarry industrial relics. Location: Pant village, west of A483, car park at end of Underhill Lane. Grid ref SJ 267 218. For more information Read more [...]

  • Breidden Hill & Rodney’s Pillar

    The Breidden Hills are an isolated group of three peaks above the right bank of the River Severn about 6 miles north east of Welshpool. The Breidden Hill is a volcanic feature, which dominates the area and stands over 1200ft high. Footpaths lead up to the summit with wonderful views Read more [...]

  • Oswestry Racecourse Common

    On the B4580 Road to Llansilin from Oswestry, the Racecourse Common was a popular venue for horse racing until 1848.  The figure of eight circuit is about mile and half long and offers spectacular views over Shropshire & Wales. Offa’s Dyke path runs along side part of the South Common. Read more [...]

  • Castle Bank

    Castle bank is all that remains of an imposing castle, which served to defend the town, & formed an important link in the chain of Norman defence along the Welsh border. There is a spectacular view of the town from the top.

  • Melverley Church

    St. Peters Church at Melverley on the River Severn has been a place of Christian worship for about 1000 years. The current church was built and in use by 1406 and the font almost certainly dates to back to Saxon times.  The church is made with local Melverley oak and the Read more [...]

  • Oswestry Hillfort (Old Oswestry)

    Old Oswestry Hill Fort – this spectacular, dramatic & mysterious 3,000-year-old hill fort marks the beginning of one of Britain’s oldest settlements, Oswestry. Old Oswestry was built and occupied during the Iron Age (800 BC to AD 43) and is one of the best-preserved hill forts in Britain. It is Read more [...]

  • Nesscliffe Hill & Kynaston’s Cave

    Nesscliffe hill is a sandstone escarpment & is now a country park with various footpaths through the woods. To the north of the hill the ramparts of an old hill fort are present. An old sandstone quarry face forms a spectacular cliff, popular for rock climbing. Cut into the cliff Read more [...]

  • Jones’ Rough

    A little hazel and yew woodland which rises to scree and cliffs with spectacular views into Wales. Offa’s Dyke Path runs through the reserve. Location: above the village of Nantmawr 3km west of Llynclys. Grid ref; SJ247 247. For more information contact the Shropshire Wildlife Trust on 01743 241691.

  • Craig Sychtyn

    Woodland with hazel coppice; mature woodland with pockets of herb-rich grassland. Unusual woodland flora includes stinking iris. Location: 7km south west of Oswestry, hard to find – map needed. Grid Ref SJ232 255. For more information contact the Shropshire Wildlife Trust on 01743 241691

  • Hawkstone Park Follies

    The Follies is an historic woodland fantasy with cliffs, crags, caves, deep woods and a series of extraordinary monuments built over 200 years ago. After years of neglect the magical landscape was lovingly restored and reopened in 1993. Parts of the park and the main walking routes contains several flights Read more [...]